Eco-Friendly Living

10 Best Charities To Donate To For Climate Change; Saving The Bees, Trees & More

I do a lot of lecturing on this blog. I have lots of posts about what to personally do when it comes to climate change. So, I want to take an opportunity to let my readers do that I do practice what I preach and put my money where my mouth is when it comes to donating to climate change charities. Sometimes cutting down on plastic or going meat-free feels like it’s not enough. That’s why I find donating to those who can do more than you are I is helpful. However, figuring out who to donate to for climate change can feel overwhelming. There are so many doing different things or have unclear motives so what do you do? I’ve narrowed down who I personally feel are good choices. I chose a wide range of environmental groups ranging from wide-reaching activism, research, arctic ice restoration, planting trees, and more.

I always want to emphasize that climate change is not because of the Average Joe. It’s not my fault or your fault. The bulk of this is very much on capitalism. However, I don’t think that means giving up and doing nothing.

If you can’t donate, share this post anyway – someone who can might see it! Rest assured, I’ll continue to donate to these environmental charities and groups on a regular basis.

This post is not sponsored and does not contain affiliate links. I choose these environmental groups and charities based on my own findings.

Here are the best charities to donate to for climate change:

Environmental Charities Protecting The Polar Ice Caps

Arctic Ice Project

white polar bear on white snowy field near canal during daytime - for the best climate change charities  list
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I was so excited when I first heard of Arctic Ice Project. When researching this, I didn’t find a single other website list them as a climate charity worth donating to! The polar ice caps are not just important because they’re home to wildlife – but saving the polar bears should be on the agenda. The ice caps actually reflective so send some of the sun’s energy back into space. Arctic Ice proposes to lay a thin layer of (animal & ocean safe) hollow glass microspheres across the article to reflect the sun. This can help to allow thin young ice to grow into thicker older ice – maintaing a home for wildlife and reflecting more of the sun’s radiation.

Learn more about Arctic Ice Project here.

Envrironmental Charities Protecting The Rainforest

Rainforest Action Network

wood light dawn landscape
Photo by alleksana on Pexels.com

One of the reasons people say we should save the rainforest is because it’s the lungs of the Earth. Trees are very important to clean air. The rainforest is home to lots of diverse flora, fauna, and even people life there. The rainforest action network pledges to challenge corporate power and systemic injustice through frontline partnerships and strategic campaigns. They also take racial inequity into account as the climate crisis mostly affects people of colour, minorities and indigenous people.

Learn more about the Rainforest Action Network here.

Adopt Rainforest

plants in the rainforest for climate change charities to donate to list
Photo by Elias Tigiser on Pexels.com

There are lots of adopt an animal initiatives like polar bears, orangutans or seals. One environmental charity asks that you adopt a part of the rainforest. For just €2.50 you can adopt 1 m² of rainforest in Costa Rica which helps to protect it. They hope to restorate at least 2000 hectares of rainforest through buying it and the active protection the rainforest and its biodiversity.

Learn more about Adopt Rainforest here.

Environmental Charities Promoting Activism & Human Rights

Food And Water Watch

"there is not plant b" poster from protest as part of climate change charities to donate to list
Photo by Markus Spiske on Pexels.com

Food and Water Watch promises to fight for access of safe food, clean water, and a livable climate for everyone. They want to protect people from corporations and others who put profit against all else. They help to come up with solutions and build up operations to help tackle the climate crisis.

Learn more about Food And Water Watch here.

Environmental Charities Protecting The Ocean

Global Coral Reef Alliance

red and white clownfish under water
Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com

The Global Coral Reef Alliance is a non-profit organization devoted to protecting the coral reefs. Coral reefs help to protect coastlines from storms and erosion. They’re also home to marine wildlife. The GCRA is made up of scientists, divers, environmentalists, and others. They focus on restoring reefs and researching the impacts of coral bleaching, marine diseases, sea levels rising, and more.

Learn more about the Global Coral Reef Alliance here.

The Maine Conservation Society

black and white turtle
Photo by Richard Segal on Pexels.com

While trees are important for the air we breathe, a lot actually comes from the ocean! This is why marine charities are some of the best charities to donate to for climate change. The Marine Conservation Society is campaigning for at least 30% of UK to be managed by 2030 to protect wildlife and ecosystems. they also advocate for beach cleans and promote sustainable fishing.

Learn more about the Marine Conservation Society here.

Environmental Charities Protecting/Planting The Trees

Crann

two brown trees
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com

While Ireland is known for being green, that doesn’t mean we’re the best when it comes to trees. In fact, Ireland has less tree cover than most other European countries! Trees are integral for helping to absorb CO2 from the air. Crann (pronounced: crown – and means “tree”) pledge to plant trees across Ireland.

Learn more about Crann here.

One Tree Planted

autumn fall forest leaves
Photo by Picography on Pexels.com

This is one of the most “affordable” climate change charities! One Tree Planted plants trees all around the world with only one dollar planting one tree.

Learn More about One Tree Planted here.

Environmental Charities Protecting Bees & Pollinators

Repollinate

close up photo of butterfly
Photo by Aenic Visuals on Pexels.com

Repollinate wants to protect and improve the pollinator population. Bees and other insects help to pollinate flowers and plants, which in turn, provide food for us. They build spaces for pollinators to thrive as well as trying to educate the public and work with the government.

Learn more about Repollinate here.

 The World Bee Project

two bees on purple flower as part of list on the best climate change charities to donate to
Photo by Michael Hodgins on Pexels.com

The World Bee Project created a globally coordinated honeybee hive monitoring initiative to examine the health and wellbeing of bees and pollinators. The data can help to shape the way we respond to threats affecting bees and other pollinators.

Learn more about The World Bee Project here.

So there we have what I think are the best charities to donate to for climate change.

What To Do If You Can’t Donate To Climate Change Charities:

Not everyone can afford to donate to climate charities. That’s okay! You can still do something. Here’s what you can do to fight against the climate crisis for free:

  • Switch your search engine: Ecosia is a search engine that plants trees with the funds for their ad-revenue. For even more (free) tree planting power, you can add opentabs.org to your browser. Every 10 taps opened saves 1 tree. They raise funds to provide poverty-reducing microloans and use the repaid funds to protect rainforests. They also promise that your data is not being collected.
  • Leave the wildflowers: if wild daisies or dandelions are sprouting in your garden; leave them be for the bees!
  • Meat free Monday: If you can’t go vegan or vegetarian, then try go one day a week without meat. I first transitioned to vegaism by cutting meat out of lunch, then going one day without meat, then two and so on-and-so-forth.
  • Walk where possible.
  • Use your vote & voice: vote for politians who have green policies and lobby your local government to do better.
  • Reuse shopping bags
  • Avoid impluse buying. There’s nothing wrong with treating yourself every now and then. I don’t love how black-and-white people look at environmentalism (or life in general) these days. You’re not evil because you want to buy nice things, just ask yourself if you really really want it and will get the use out of it first.
  • Stop the fast fashion hauls: Not everyone can completely cut out fast fashion – that doesn’t make you evil. However, if it’s something you can financially do and is accessible, give the fast fashion a skip. Opt for sustainably produced better qualities pieces or go thrifting when you need a new outfit.
  • Cut up your waste: if you need to use a plastic straw, cut it down the middle before disposing it just in case it ends up in the ocean and up some poor sea turtles nose. If you have plastic rings from cans, cut those up too as they can trap sea gulls and fish.
  • Stop wishcycling: A worrying amount of what goes into the recycling bin is actually recyclable. This means that with so much contimated recycle bins, a lot less than you think is actually recycled. If something is not clearly indicated as recyclable; don’t put it in the recycle bin.

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